News

Role of dads continues to evolve

By: Evamarie Socha, The Daily Item

SUNBURY– Happy Father’s Day, dad. Chances are good that these days, you and your wife work, you do more around the house, you try hard to spend time with your children but it’s a challenge with your job, and you might be in the growing minority of fathers who stay at home with the kids.

Those are five facts about today’s American father, according to a study the Pew Research Center released in time for Father’s Day.

For sure, today’s dads are much different their dads. Read the full article.

Source: The Daily Item, Saturday, June 20, 2015

Step one: Half of PSU profit could fund child-abuse efforts

By: Anthony Butto, DSW, My Turn

I should begin with the disclosure that I am not a Penn State alum nor am I a football fan. My interest in the Penn State/Jerry Sandusky travesty is purely from a social and clinical perspective.

For 30 years as a therapist and program director of a counseling center, I have witnessed first-hand the devastating and indelible psychological pain caused by child abuse. The hurt, confusion and severe psychological damage to victims most often endure for a lifetime.

For victim’s fortunate enough to have timely and proper treatment, a process of normalcy and recovery can begin. Sadly, most victims receive no care, or at best, inadequate care after the abuse is discovered. Read the full article.

Source: The Daily Item, Saturday, July 14, 2012

After assault, abusers dupe kids

By: Rick Dandes, The Daily Item

Children are most often afraid to report sexual assaults, mostly because the abuser brainwashes, trick, manipulates, and grooms his victims to believe that no one will believe them if they tell, a Valley counselor said last week, when the child sexual abuse trial of Jerry Sandusky got under way.

Sandusky, 68, a former Penn State assistant coach, is facing 52 charges of child sexual abuse. His trial, which resumes Monday, gives Valley child care experts the opportunity to educate parents about predators and to encourage children who might have been sexual victims to come forward.

“For their own psychological health, it is essential to do to,” said Melissa DeBaro, Child Advocacy Center coordinator, Northumberland. “The more we don’t talk about sexual predators, and also don’t teach ourselves and our children about healthy sexual development, the more we are grooming out children to be abused and/or exploited.” Read the full Article

Mediation eliminates stress

By: Bevin Milavsky, The Daily Item

Children are most often afraid to report sexual assaults, mostly because the abuser brainwashes, trick, manipulates, and grooms his victims to believe that no one will believe them if they tell, a Valley counselor said last week, when the child sexual abuse trial of Jerry Sandusky got under way.

Sandusky, 68, a former Penn State assistant coach, is facing 52 charges of child sexual abuse. His trial, which resumes Monday, gives Valley child care experts the opportunity to educate parents about predators and to encourage children who might have been sexual victims to come forward. Read the full article.

Child sexual abuse: Frequency and nature, effects, and recovery.

Listen to the WKOK Roundtable with Dr. Tony Butto, Dr. Teresa Buzzini and Dr. Glenn Jacobson

This broadcast was awarded first place by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster Association, Public Affairs Programming. The program on child sexual assault first aired in late 2011 and has been rebroadcast several times. Featured on the program were staff members of the Courtyard Counseling Center in Selinsgrove: Dr. Tony Butto, Director of the Clinic, Dr. Glenn Jacobson, and Dr. Teresa Drost Buzzini. Our staff discussed the frequency and nature, effects, and the recovery process of child sexual abuse.

Also discussed on the program was the Penn State/Jerry Sandusky case and lessons that should be garnered from such a public example of how child sexual abuse occurs and what people should do if they even suspect that a child is being abused. Emphasis was placed on all citizens, not just those who are mandated by law to report such incidents.

Child sexual assualt: Prevention, identifying and surviving.

Listen to the WKOK Roundtable with Dr. Tony Butto, Dr. Teresa Buzzini and Glenn Jacobson

  • 1070 WKOK
  • Original Air Date: Nov 20, 2011

PSU scandal III: Help for victims

SELINSGROVE – What happened at Penn State University with assistant coach Jerry Sandusky can be a learning experience for many. Tony Butto, psychotherapist and head of the Courtyard Counseling Center in Selinsgrove, says the publicity surrounding the case can have quite an impact in a number of areas. Butto says it’s opened up a lot of painful memories for people who are victims.

Butto says the publicity might encourage victims to come out of the shadows and begin to talk about their experiences. Also, for those who are still victims, Butto hopes it gives them confidence to speak out about those who have hurt them.

Butto says sexual abuse is very devastating on anyone. He says it can set into motion a lifetime of pain and doubt. Butto says it can create profound confusion about their personal security, especially in relationships. Abuse also can trigger depression and anxiety and destructive behavior. Often times, Butto says there is guilt involved in adults who were abused as children.

Read online at WKOK News

  • Ali Stevens
  • 1070 WKOK
  • November 11th, 2011

Psychotherapy is effective and here’s why

Psychotherapy works, and the science and research are there to back it up, said Bruce E. Wampold, PhD, at the APA 2011 Annual Convention symposium, “Psychotherapy Effectiveness: What Makes it Work?”

Answering just what makes it work is complex, said Wampold, a professor of counseling psychology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, but relationships and customized treatments play key roles.

Read more at APA.org

  • A. Brownawell and K. Kelley
  • Monitor on Psychology
  • October 2011, Vol 42, No. 9
  • Print version: page 14

‘Take it one minute at a time’
Holiday most difficult in first year after death of loved one

By: Rick Dandes The Daily Item

December is a festive month, a universal time for the gathering of family and friends. But for some people grieving the recent death of a loved one, this Christmas may not be a happy one.

“That first Christmas without a loved one can be very, very tough,” said Anthony G. Butto, of Selinsgrove, a therapist who specializes in marital and family issues.

“Because of its religious and cultural importance, the emphasis we place on family, happiness and being together can make the holidays a desired and anticipated time, or one of dread,” said Mr. Butto, who holds a doctorate in social work. Read the full article.

Online Therapy Isn’t Shrinking

The idea of online therapy has lots of folks in the industry wondering whether it’s any better than Lucy Van Pelt hanging up a sign reading, “Psychiatric Help 5 cents.”

Online therapy is dangerous, critics say. Quacks could set up shop and scam customers. Discontents who are looking for a quick fix could score drugs with a simple mouseclick. The entire mental health industry may degenerate into a Geraldo Riverian mess. At a Capitol Hill news conference last week, a coalition of medical practitioners and patient advocates released a set of guidelines to keep that from happening before the government gets a chance to step in and do it for them. But critics say those standards might not be enough, and warn that mixing professional counseling with the Internet is a potentially volatile situation that the government is not likely to ignore.

The guidelines — the eHealth Code of Ethics — aren’t revolutionary. They’re voluntary rules drawn up by the Internet Healthcare Coalition that ask the players in this field (and in the electronic health field in general) to stay the course and follow a set of standards that some sites say they were already following.

The rules ask sites — of which there are an estimated 300 — to disclose financial ties they may have with other companies or organizations and to protect patients’ privacy and let them know exactly how their information will be used.

Gunny Cho, CEO of the online therapy site Here2listen.com, said his company was already adhering to the guidelines suggested in the new code.

“We were taking the highest of the high moral ground,” he said.

Cho said most of the people who use Stanford University-backed Here2Listen’s fee-based, real-time chat service are looking for help with personal relationships and life’s stresses. None of them will be hooked up with drugs, he said, because Here2Listen’s shrinks are there to listen, not prescribe.

Cho is a businessman, though, and has no background in the mental health field.

Psychology-ethics expert Thomas Nagy is wary of how his field is embracing the Internet as a clinical medium.

The assistant clinical professor at Stanford Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, who maintains a private practice as a psychologist in Palo Alto, says online therapy is rife with risks.

“There’s no training or research in Internet therapy, and there’s no definition of what it is,” he said.

He said face-to-face counseling, or at least telephonic therapy, is always superior to online therapy.

“With words on a screen you have such a narrow bandwidth of emotional overtones,” he said. “I would always argue for telephone consultation instead of email therapy. I think there’s so much more information available, you can at least tell something about (a patient’s) emotional tone.”

Glenn Marron, a psychologist who maintains a private practice in New York and once served as consultant to the government, agreed that the industry is moving quicker than it should.

“I think there’s no question that ultimately this indeed is going to be one of the main formats for mental health,” she said. “The technology is far more advanced than the infrastructure and guidelines we have.”

“The mental health industry has been moving toward “telehealth” – the use of electronic communications and IT to support clinical care — for years. The U.S. Department of Commerce says telehealth is employed by the mental health industry more than any other health field.

Both Nagy and Marron are concerned that a patient might have signs of symptoms or disabilities that would be invisible to a therapist communicating via email and chat. No code, they said, is going to change that.

  • By Lynn Burke
  • Wired
  • 2000-05-30

Psychotherapy Helps Teens Control Diabetes

By Megan Rauscher

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes do better with a program of intensive, home-based, family-centered psychotherapy, according to new research.

Teens with type 1 diabetes, which requires regular insulin injections and careful monitoring of blood sugar levels, have been considered “very difficult to manage clinically,” Dr. Deborah A. Ellis told Reuters Health.

“Our study showed that families were willing to receive behavioral treatment when it was provided in their home and that such intensive behavioral interventions can result in improved outcomes,” she said.

In their study, reported in the journal Diabetes Care, Ellis from Wayne State University in Detroit and colleagues randomly assigned 127 adolescents with a history of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes to standard medical care only or to standard medical care plus 6 months of an intervention targeting problems related to adherence to diabetes treatment.

The behavioral intervention was successful in improving diabetes control, the team reports. Average long-term blood sugar control improved to a degree that was both statistically significant and clinically meaningful, Ellis and colleagues note.

The strategy led to more frequent blood glucose testing. “Frequent testing of blood glucose has been linked to better metabolic control and may therefore account for the improvements in metabolic control experienced by the group,” the investigators write.

This study shows that home-based therapy “holds promise in improving the diabetes management and metabolic control of adolescents,” the team concludes, but they point out that longer follow up is needed to see whether the effects are long-lasting.

SOURCE: Diabetes Care, July 2005

Interaction Consultants

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW maintains a wonderful collection of articles relating to parenting, and marriage and family.

Check out www.yoursocialworker.com